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Bradley County Medical Center News




Angel One Transport Recognizes BCMC's Lephiew, Staff


Angel One Transport of Arkansas Children's Hospital recently recognized the outstanding assistance of Bradley County Medical Center's Roy Lephiew along with the entire maintenance crew and nursing staff.

The letter from Angel One Transport stated the team received excellent assistance from the maintenance crew and nursing staff. The letter specifically pointed out Lephiew's hard work as he was able to assist and troubleshoot some issues, while also making several trips to and from the ER.

The letter continues, "Roy has come from home at all hours of the day and night to meet our crew on multiple occasions, always eager to assist and knowledgeable in our needs for transport. All your staff were extremely helpful and professional."

BCMC held a reception with cake and punch in honor of Lephiew, along with our exceptional maintenance and nursing staffs, Wednesday afternoon inside the main hallway of the hospital. A large crowd of employees gathered to thank Lephiew and our other staff members involved, while Chief Nursing Officer Sarah Tucker and Laber and Delivery Nurse Manager Krissy Morrison presented Lephiew with the letter and plaque from Angel One Transport.



Rawls Earns DAISY Award for Heroic Effort


Karen Rawls was chosen as the recipient of The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses ® in a presentation Monday afternoon at Bradley County Medical Center. This award is part of the DAISY Foundation's mission to recognize the extraordinary, compassionate nursing care they provide patients and families every day.

Rawls, who serves as BCMC's Surgery Department's manager, was on vacation in Hot Springs when she administered CPR to save a young boy's life.

Here is full account of events that were included in the nomination by Jacob Standley:

"Saturday May 18, 2019 at an RV park in Hot Springs while visiting with friends, I witnessed a life changing event. We were located near the local swimming pool, when a commotion behind us took place. A teenager and woman (Karen) pulled a blue lifeless body out of the pool. My friends and I were witnessing the drowning of a child approximately 3.5 years old. Karen started rolling the child around to expel the water that had been consumed. The mother took the boy from Karen and started rocking him, not knowing what else to do. I heard Karen calmly with confidence tell the mom, 'I've got this, I'm a nurse.' I have never; and don't know that I ever will again witness a mother just give a child in distress up that willingly. My friend had training as a fireman EMT and asked if he could help with the CPR. Karen replied "we need to get some water out of him before we do CPR". There were several other children around and my wife and one of our friends helped collect the children to keep them occupied. I then walked back to my chair, sat down and said a quick prayer. Afterwards, I watched Karen administer CPR to a very blue lifeless body. When the child was choking and trying to expel the contents, Karen never wavered. She continued thru this event that seemed like it was lasting forever. I heard Karen encourage the child as he came in and out a couple of times, each time I would see movement then he would stop. This was an emotional rollercoaster for everyone witnessing this event, yet again, Karen never wavered. She continued always telling the child to stay with her and to wake up. I know this must have only lasted about 3 minutes but in this very intense moment, time seemed to stop.

I then saw the lifeless body moving, first a cough and then a gag, just a few more blows and he started crying. I never thought that would be such a welcoming sound. It wasn't until then, that Karen relinquished the child to very anxious and upset mother. Just a short while after, the police and ambulance arrived and took the child and mother to the hospital. I walked back to my chair and finished my prayer with thanks. I then went to Karen to thank her and when I asked Karen if she knew the boy's name, she wasn't real sure, how fitting is that. Karen never even asked for the child's name, she just did the right thing. I don't know if the EMTs ever talked to Karen, so credit was never issued and of course she never asked for it.

I know that many of you may know more explicit details that I left out but this event has changed every one that witnessed it. From giving thanks to a having different kind of respect for pools and to life itself. I often drink coffee and spend time with others that were at the scene & it has changed all of our lives. I don't know the overall outcome of the child; however, I know that without Karen's presence and her being responsive with her training he would have expired right there on the spot. I can only hope that whatever damage this event may have caused, is short served with him. Thanks to Karen and her life saving skills, she reacted to a life threatening situation and took complete control. Karen's actions were of a servant; how is one supposed to say thank you to that. Please know she showed courage and responsibility in the face of a horrific challenge. She is the mirror image of someone of her past and they are to be commended also."

Rawls received a certificate commending her for being an "Extraordinary Nurse." The certificate reads: "In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people." Additionally, she was given a beautiful and meaningful sculpture called A Healer's Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Africa, a box of cinnamon rolls, and a banner for her office. Standley, who nominated her, was also present, while a number of Rawls' family members and co-workers were also in attendance.

The Award at Bradley County Medical Center is co-sponsored by generous donations. Initial funding was provided by the facility. The program is maintained through generous support from donors, to include a large donation from an anonymous donor, from committee members, from the Employee Council, and other fundraisers.

The DAISY Foundation is a not-for-profit organization, established in memory of J. Patrick Barnes, by members of his family. Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. (DAISY is an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System.) The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

Nurses were nominated by patients, families, and colleagues. The nominations were blinded and voted on by the DAISY Committee. Cheryl Wells serves as DAISY coordinator. The nominations were graded based on set criteria, a numeric value was assigned based on this criteria, and awards were determined based on score. The committee members voted. The process was overseen by the DAISY coordinator.

This is one initiative of The DAISY Foundation to express gratitude to the nursing profession. Additionally, DAISY offers J. Patrick Barnes Grants for Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Projects, The DAISY Faculty Award to honor inspiring faculty members in schools and colleges of nursing, and The DAISY in Training Award for nursing students. More information is available at http://DAISYfoundation.org.



BCMC Holds Successful M*A*S*H Camp


The 2019 version of M*A*S*H Camp was completed Friday, June 28 as 12 students from Warren, Hermitage, Fordyce, and Rison were able to experience a number of medical-related activities throughout the two-week event June 17-28. The majority of the program was spent at Bradley County Medical Center, but the group was able to travel to other healthcare organizations around Warren and also took trips to El Dorado and Little Rock.

M*A*S*H stands for Medical Applications of Science for Health and was a huge success after the program took a short hiatus, but was brought back to life with the help of Alaina Glover. Glover is a student at the University of Arkansas at Monticello and is a double major in biology and biochemistry with a possible minor in psychology as a pre-med student. In addition to being a student, Glover works at BCMC as a lab assistant phlebotomist and volunteered to lead the M*A*S*H program along with BCMC's Kathy Hall, who is over Employee Health and Infection Control.

"I volunteered for the M*A*S*H program we had here before I was old enough and just fell in love with the different aspects the students learn about," Glover said. "So many don't what all it takes to create a hospital, it's not just doctors, nurses, radiology, because there are so many more fields. Then I was able to participate in the camp when I got old enough and loved it."

The camp started Monday, June 17 with HIPPA training and a get to know each other session before learning about IV and injections. The camp continued each day through Friday, June 21 before the students came back Monday, June 24 for another week of activities. The students were able to tour BCMC and also stopped by a number of departments including Radiology, Laboratory, Surgery, Nuclear Medicine, Pharmacy, Medical Records, 1st Station, ER, Respiratory Therapy, Human Resources, Rehab Services, and the Family Care Clinic.

"So when I found out they didn't have it last year, it disheartened me and I offered to direct it," Glover continued. "It's been a good opportunity for me and I've learned so much by leading it. I've really enjoyed it and I've met so many different contacts from around the state and also doctors, nurses, and others here that I didn't talk to much before this."

Students received demonstrations and listened to presentations on a multitude of other items, most coming with the chance to receive hands-on training as well. The group learned about different types of medical equipment, CPR, how to stop bleeds, wound care, hospice, anesthesia, intubation, oral health, casts, family practice, and more. The Arkansas State Police made a very informative presentation to the group, while Emergency Ambulance Service, Inc., (EASI) also had a very entertaining presentation that featured BCMC Rehab Services manager Stephanie Moring playing a mock victim that needed an ambulance. The students had to keep her calm, put pressure on wounds, and keep her awake before the ambulance arrived.

Other presenters included UAM Pre-Med and UAM Nursing, while the students were also educated in mental health and opioids. They also toured HOPE Landing in El Dorado on Thursday, June 20 and were also able to visit local vets and dentists. On Thursday, June 27 the campers went to Little Rock to tour UAMS with other M*A*S*H programs around the state.

The camp concluded with suturing and heart dissection led by Dr. Roger Mason. Edwin Martinez, Leah Huitt, Cindy Wilkerson, and Allison King earned four out of five stars for suturing from Dr. Mason, while Alyssa Overton had the fastest surgery time of the group at 51.57 seconds. The final event of the day was a graduation ceremony and reception for the students and their families inside the BCMC Conference Room.

The students that participated in this year's camp were Edwin Martinez, Leah Huitt, Cindy Wilkerson, Jordan Pruitt, Erynn Lasiter, Allison King, Ashton Gorman, Iyania Smith, Dejah Battles, Alyssa Overton, Janzee Hooper, and Erin Watkins.



Emergency Blood Drive to Be Held at BCMC


Bradley County Medical Center will host an emergency blood drive on Thursday, June 27 from 1 p.m.-7p.m. inside the MCU Clinic. Due to extremely low donations and stock available on hand, LifeShare has asked hospitals to host additional local blood drives.

Patient care could be threatened by the inadequate blood supply that the region has been experiencing for several weeks. "Unfortunately, for many people, it is a problem you don't realize exists unless you have a friend or family member in the hospital whose treatment is delayed or postponed because blood is not available," says LifeShare Regional Director Bobby Carney.

LifeShare Blood Center, established in Shreveport, La., in 1942, regularly supplies blood components and related services to more than 100 medical facilities throughout Louisiana, East Texas, and South Arkansas. Bradley County Medical Center hosts four blood drives a year, but is happy to help answer the call for this emergency blood drive as it affects the amount of blood we can have at our hospital along with helping out other hospitals in the region.

This drive is taking place long enough after our last drive on May 7 that if you donated then you should be able to donate again for this one. BCMC and LifeShare are asking anyone who is eligible to donate blood. More information about donor eligibility and upcoming blood drives can be found at www.LifeShare.org.



BCMC Celebrates Hospital Week


Bradley County Medical Center recently joined hospitals around the nation in celebrating National Hospital Week May 12-18 and held a number of events throughout the course of the week for employees.

The week started off with a donut breakfast sponsored by First State Bank and Dr. Joe Wharton. Monday morning a "Blessing of the Hands" took place in the chapel. It's a non-denominational service that dates back to Florence Nightingale and was led by Rev. Gary Harrison of First United Methodist Church in Warren. There was also a snack service for employees along with a couple of tours by HOSA students. Mayor Denisa Pennington made a public proclamation at 10 a.m. that was attended by a large number of employees before an evening fish fry to close out the day.

Tuesday's events included a chair massage sponsored by Concord Medical Group, while a service awards lunch was held in the conference room thanks to Warren Bank & Trust. Tuesday's afternoon event featured representatives from Union Bank serving ice cream. Wednesday morning saw the return of the administration pancake breakfast from 6 a.m.-8 a.m., while Radiology sponsored a game which had people trying to guess what the foreign bodies on certain x-rays were. Wednesday's activities concluded with team games.

BCMC employees enjoyed a barbecue lunch sponsored by Legacy Rehab Thursday, while hospital trivia and a snack service were the other events of the day. Friday closed out the celebration with a number of prizes handed out, while the BCMC Auxiliary Reception from 2-4 p.m. marked the end of Hospital Week. Artwork from a number of students from Eastside Elementary was displayed all week, while cash prizes were also randomly given to employees.

The Human Resources department was largely responsible for making the week run smoothly along with help from the Public Relations staff. Thanks for a great Hospital Week!

Vote to Help Make Warren Shine Win $5000 from Shelter Insurance


Make Warren Shine and the Warren High School EAST Program are in the running to win $5000 for Make Warren Shine from Shelter Insurance. Students in the EAST Program along with Mrs. Leah St. John put together a video entitled "Warren: Our Shining Communities" part of the competition. Winners will be determined by online voting. So, every vote counts.

Simply go to https://a.cstmapp.com/p/30295 to reach the Thankful for Our Communities website. Then click on the Vote for Entries. Scroll down until you see the Leah St. John entry. Watch the short video and then vote. It will ask you for you name and email and to verify that you are not a robot. The deadline to vote is May 13.



BCMC Honors Employees at Spring Fling


Bradley County Medical Center recently announced its service awards over the weekend at its annual Spring Fling Saturday evening at the new armory building in Warren.

The Spring Fling is organized by the BCMC Employee Council and this year's event was catered by Dorey's Catfish, while the attendees enjoyed music, games, and door prizes.

Additionally, Human Resources Director Brooke Hatch and CEO Steve Henson handed out service awards. Terry Young, Director of Purchasing, was named the 2018 BCMC Employee of the Year.

Other honorees are listed below.

35 Years of Service: Tammy Hensley
30 Years of Service: Benita Harton
25 Years of Service: Elaine Mills, Judy Barnes, Steven Smith
20 Years of Service: Jane Harris, Ben Copico
15 Years of Service: Gwendolyn Jimerson, April Smith, Terry Young, Tim Saunders, Sherazade Guanzon, Carla Miller
10 Years of Service: Sarah Farrer, Brandon Gorman, Cherice Preston, Karen Rawls, Renee Satterlee
5 Years of Service: Betty Burns, Thelma Coleman, Tina Conner, Lula Coulter, Laci Dalton, Thelma Ferrell, Brandy Files, Jessie Grant, April Gray, Barbara Harvey, Dawn Huitt, Joyce Lephiew, Kelley McCartney, Deedre Pierce, Kathy Ragan, Tanya Robertson, Rhondy Roque, Tabatha Shoaf, Jeff Sutherland, Abbie Trammel, Jeffrey Whipple



BCMC Receives Excellence in Healthcare Award from PRC


Bradley County Medical Center was recently recognized as a 4-Star award winner in inpatient services for patient experience by national healthcare research leader Professional Research Consultants, Inc. (PRC).

The Excellence in Healthcare Awards recognize organizations and individuals who achieve excellence throughout the year by improving patient experiences, healthcare employee engagement, and/or physician alignment and engagement based on surveys of their patients.

"I am proud for the staff and physicians at BCMC that they have received this recognition from an outside source," BCMC CEO Steve Henson said. "Every day as I walk through the hospital I see the little things that our staff does for our patients and visitors that makes the service experience here different and sets us apart from our peers. I look forward to our continuing to improve our service to our patients and visitors as we continue to build on our success."

BCMC received marks above the national average in all 10 categories recorded by HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) and were above the Arkansas hospital average in all but one category. Some of the highlights included 87% of patients reporting their nurses always communicated well along with 93% describing their doctors as always communicating well. The national average in both categories was 80% and 81%, respectively.

Additionally, 93% of patients reported they were given information about what to do during their recovery at home and 84% gave BCMC a 9 or 10 rating on a scale of 1-10. The number of patients that reported they would recommend Bradley County Medical Center was 73%.

"It is an honor to recognize Bradley County Medical Center with this Excellence in Healthcare Award for their deserving work," said Joe M. Inguanzo, Ph.D., President and CEO of PRC. "It takes true dedication and determination to achieve this level of excellence in healthcare and BCMC has shown their commitment to making their hospital a better place to work, a better place to practice medicine and a better place for patients to be treated."

To learn more about the 2019 Excellence in Healthcare Awards, including eligibility and criteria, visit PRCCustomResearch.com.

About PRC
Professional Research Consultants, Inc. (PRC) is a national healthcare market research company. For more than 35 years, PRC has facilitated millions of interviews, delivered insightful reports and provided customized research solutions to hospitals and healthcare organizations. Services measure community perceptions, brand positions, patient experience, physician alignment and engagement, and employee engagement. PRC is also a certified vendor for government-mandated CAHPS surveys and has partnered with more than 400 communities across the U.S. to conduct Community Health Needs Assessments.

Sign up for M*A*S*H Camp NOW!


It's time to sign up for BCMC's M*A*S*H program this summer. It will run June 17-28, 2019 and is for area high school students that are currently in the 10th or 11th grade.

Please download this form to apply.

PLEASE MAIL COMPLETED APPLICATION, TRANSCRIPT (MUST INCLUDE CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE) AND SIGNED CONSENT FORMS BY April 5, 2019 TO:

M*A*S*H PROGRAM
Bradley County Medical Center
404 South Bradley Street
Warren, Arkansas 71671

Tolefree Receives DAISY Award at BCMC


Paulette Tolefree was chosen as the recipient of The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses ® for the fourth quarter of 2018 in a presentation Thursday afternoon at Bradley County Medical Center. This award is part of the DAISY Foundation's mission to recognize the extraordinary, compassionate nursing care they provide patients and families every day.

Tolefree's nomination form mentioned how kind and caring she was starting a number of years ago and how she still assists this patient to this day. "She shows a true love for people. The best thing is, if you know Paulette at all, you know she doesn't believe she deserves any recognition. She truly believes what she does is just what she's supposed to do."

In addition to Tolefree, nurses Kim Langford, Steven Smith, and Dana Sawyer were also nominated for the last quarter. Each received an honorary pin. Also present was Kara Ellis from the DAISY Foundation. Ellis is the Regional Program Manager for the South Central Region and she helped assist with the award ceremony.

Tolefree received a certificate commending her for being an "Extraordinary Nurse." The certificate reads: "In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people." Additionally, she was given a beautiful and meaningful sculpture called A Healer's Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Africa, a box of cinnamon rolls, and a banner for her office.

The Award at Bradley County Medical Center is co-sponsored by generous donations. Initial funding was provided by the facility. The program is maintained through generous support from donors, to include a large donation from an anonymous donor, from committee members, from the Employee Council, and from Yankee Candle Sales.

The DAISY Foundation is a not-for-profit organization, established in memory of J. Patrick Barnes, by members of his family. Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. (DAISY is an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System.) The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

Nurses were nominated by patients, families, and colleagues. The nominations were blinded and voted on by the DAISY Committee. Cheryl Wells serves as DAISY coordinator. The nominations were graded based on set criteria, a numeric value was assigned based on this criteria, and awards were determined based on score. The committee members voted. The process was overseen by the DAISY coordinator.

This is one initiative of The DAISY Foundation to express gratitude to the nursing profession. Additionally, DAISY offers J. Patrick Barnes Grants for Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Projects, The DAISY Faculty Award to honor inspiring faculty members in schools and colleges of nursing, and The DAISY in Training Award for nursing students. More information is available at http://DAISYfoundation.org.

National Donor Day is Feb. 14; Shares Observance Date with Most Caring Holiday of the Year


Little Rock, Ark. (2-13-19)- During the month of February, nothing says "I'm thinking of you" and "I care" more than a greeting card adorned with hearts and flowers; nothing, except a drivers' license or state ID card imprinted with the phrase "organ donor."

February 14th is National Donor Day in Arkansas, and across America. On this day donation partners-including ARORA, transplant centers and hospitals-take this opportunity to raise awareness of the life-saving and life-enhancing benefits of organ, tissue and eye donation. National Donor Day is also a time to encourage everyone to register to become a donor. In Arkansas, it is easy to register by logging onto arora.org, or by visiting any local Department of Motor Vehicles office when applying for or renewing a driver's license or state identification card.

Currently, there are more than 113,000 people on the national waiting list for a life-saving heart, kidney, lung, kidney, pancreas, liver, intestines or a combination of these organs. The need for transplantable organs greatly outweighs the number of available organs, which is one of the reasons donor registration is so important.

Here are some important facts about donation:
•20 people die each day awaiting a transplant
•Every 10 minutes another person is added to the organ waiting list
•Only 3 in 1000 people die in a manner that allows them to become organ donors
•1 organ donor can save up to 8 lives
•1 organ and tissue donor can save and/or enhance up to 100 lives

In the spirit of this day of observance of the benefits of life-saving gifts, National Donor Day is a great time to have a caring conversation with loved ones to inform them of donation wishes. This is important, because in Arkansas, family members cannot override a registered Arkansan's intent to donate organs.

This National Donor Day, ARORA sends its sincere thanks to all hospital donation partners for their support of ARORA's mission to restore lives through the recovery of organs and tissues for transplant, and for encouraging Arkansans to "Save 8. Donate." by registering to become donors.




BCMC Participates in American Heart Association's Little Hats, Big Hearts™


WARREN, Ark. (2/1/19) - This month Bradley County Medical Center is providing small red knit caps to new babies and their families. The caps are thanks to the American Heart Association's Little Hats Big Hearts program. Along with a knit cap for the new baby, parents will receive information about the importance of starting healthy habits at a young age. The initiative is in connection with the Children's Heart Foundation and locally sponsored by Delta Dental of Arkansas.

Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defect of babies born in the United States, impacting eight in every 1,000 babies. Volunteer knitters across the state provided the crochet and knit caps.

"Heart disease is 80 percent preventable - and the best way to do that is by teaching children heart-healthy habits as early as possible. We are truly grateful for our volunteer knitters, our hospitals who are distributing the hats, and for Delta Dental of Arkansas for supporting this wonderful cause," says Joyce Taylor Executive Director of the Central Arkansas American Heart Association.

In addition to BCMC, facilities in Little Rock, Batesville, Benton, Camden, Hot Springs, Jonesboro, Mena, Newport, Paragould, Russellville, Searcy, El Dorado, Pine Bluff, Monticello, Stuttgart, Mountain Home, and Conway are also participating in the program.

Little Hats, Big Hearts™ started in Chicago in 2014. From just 300 little hats in the first year, the program has now embraced hundreds of thousands of babies across more than 40 states.

About the American Heart Association
The American Heart Association is a leading force for a world of longer, healthier lives. With nearly a century of lifesaving work, the Dallas-based association is dedicated to ensuring equitable health for all. We are a trustworthy source empowering people to improve their heart health, brain health and well-being. We collaborate with numerous organizations and millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, advocate for stronger public health policies, and share lifesaving resources and information. Connect with us on heart.org, Facebook, Twitter or by calling 1-800-AHA-USA1.

About the Children's Heart Foundation
Established by Betsy Peterson in 1996, The Children's Heart Foundation (CHF) is the country's leading national organization solely committed to congenital heart research funding. CHF is a national 501(c)(3) tax‐exempt charitable organization, whose mission is to fund the most promising research to advance the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital heart defects. Since 1996, CHF has funded millions of dollars of research across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, please visit: www.childrensheartfoundation.org. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.



Bradley County Medical Center Receives National Recognition for Performance Leadership in Outcomes from NOSORH


Recently, as part of the celebration of National Rural Health Day, Bradley County Medical Center announced it has been recognized by The Chartis Center of Rural Health and the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH) for overall excellence in Outcomes, reflecting top quartile performance among all rural hospitals in the nation.

"I am very pleased with the work that the staff at BCMC has done in order to be recognized for overall excellence in Outcomes," CEO Steve Henson said. "We continually strive to improve ourselves in order that we may better serve our communities and this is a fine example of our commitment."

BCMC was one of just five hospitals in Arkansas to receive the recognition for overall excellence in Outcomes from the organization.

The Performance Leadership Awards are determined each year using iVantage Health Analytics' Hospital Strength INDEX®, the industry's most comprehensive and objective assessment of rural hospital performance. Leveraging data from public data sources, the INDEX aggregates data from 50 rural-relevant metrics across eight pillars to derive a single overall percentile rating for all Critical Access Hospitals and Rural & Community Hospitals. The Performance Leadership Awards spotlight top performance in the areas of Quality, Outcomes and Patient Perspective.

"National Rural Health Day provides the ideal opportunity to spotlight the power of rural and recognize those facilities excelling in Quality, Patient Satisfaction and Outcomes," said Michael Topchik, National Leader, The Chartis Center for Rural Health. "We're thrilled to partner with NOSORH on this program and commend this year's recipients who are working diligently to provide quality care within their communities."

About NOSORH
The National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH) was established in 1995 to assist State Offices of Rural Health in their efforts to improve access to, and the quality of, health care for America's 61 million rural citizens. NOSORH enhances the capacity of SORHs to do this by supporting the development of state and community rural health leaders; creating and facilitating state, regional and national partnerships that foster information sharing and spur rural health-related programs/activities; and enhancing access to quality healthcare services in rural communities.

About The Chartis Group
The Chartis Group® (Chartis) provides comprehensive advisory services and analytics to the healthcare industry. With an unparalleled depth of expertise in strategic planning, performance excellence, informatics and technology, and health analytics, Chartis helps leading academic medical centers, integrated delivery networks, children's hospitals and healthcare service organizations achieve transformative results. The Chartis Center for Rural Health (CCRH) was formed in 2016 to offer tailored services, performance management solutions, research and education to rural hospitals and facilities. Learn more at Chartisrural.com.

It's National Nurse Practitioner Week! (Nov. 11-17)


Get to Know April Harris, APRN

1. Where are you from and what high school did you attend?

I am from Warren, Arkansas and Graduated from Warren High School.

2. Where did you attend college and what degrees did you obtain?

I am a graduate of the University of Arkansas-Monticello with a Bachelor's of Science in Nursing.

I graduated from Walden University with a Master's of Science Nursing (Family).

3. What drew you back to the Bradley County/Warren area?

When you are born and raised in a town like Warren you visit many places but you soon realize there is no place like home and the people there!!!!

4. Why did you decide to become a nurse practitioner?

Becoming a nurse practitioner has always been my goal, and I just knew that this is what I was meant to become in life.

5. What is the most rewarding part of being a nurse practitioner?

The most rewarding part of being a nurse practitioner being able to help those you can and comfort those you can't.

6. What do you consider the most important aspect of your job?

I believe the most important aspect of my job is fellowship with my patients.

7. Anything else you'd like to share for Nurse Practitioner Week?

With each and every day I learn something new. I don't know everything but I am eager and willing to learn.
Happy Nurse Practitioner Week to my partner Kristen and everyone!!!
"Sometimes I inspire my patients; more often they inspire me." - Unknown

Get to know Kristen Harvey, APRN

1. Where are you from and what high school did you attend?

I was raised and currently reside in Monticello with my husband, Alex and our 2 children, Hudson (9) and Hadleigh (5). I graduated from Monticello High School.

2. Where did you attend college and what degrees did you obtain?

I completed my Bachelor's Degree as a Registered Nurse at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and obtained my Masters of Science in Nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner through Simmons College.

3. What drew you to the Bradley County/Warren area?

I love being a part of a small community. I am excited to be involved with a new clinic that has great potential to grow and serve locally. Coming from Monticello (Who has always rivaled with Warren in football), I have been welcomed with open arms by everyone!

4. Why did you decide to become a nurse practitioner?

I am passionate about healthcare and helping others. As a nurse, I was interested in advancing my career but not losing the 1-on-1 patient interaction. Becoming a Nurse Practitioner has allowed me to advance my knowledge and clinical skills while still providing hands on patient care!

5. What is the most rewarding part of being a nurse practitioner?

The most rewarding part for me, is when I know I have made a positive influence in someone else's life.

6. What do you consider the most important aspect of your job?

Listening.

Providing the safest and most effective care guided by my knowledge and research, on a patient individualized basis.

7. Anything else you'd like to share for Nurse Practitioner Week?

Favorite Quote:
"The Best Way to Find Yourself is to Lose Yourself in the Service of Others" Mahatma Gandhi

Kristen's office hours are Monday-Thursday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the BCMC Family Care Clinic across the street from the hospital.

American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging Statement on Radiation Received to the Thyroid from Mammography


Concern that the small amount of radiation a patient receives from a mammogram may significantly increase the likelihood of developing thyroid cancer simply is not supported in scientific literature.

The radiation dose to the thyroid from a mammogram is extremely low. The thyroid is not exposed to the direct X-ray beam used to image the breast and receives only a tiny amount of scattered X-rays (less than 0.005 milligray). This is equivalent to only 30 minutes of natural background radiation received by all Americans from natural sources.

For annual screening mammography from ages 40-80, the cancer risk from this tiny amount of radiation scattered to the thyroid is incredibly small (less than 1 in 17.1 million women screened). This minute risk should be balanced with the fact that thyroid shield usage could interfere with optimal positioning and could result in artifacts - shadows that might appear on the mammography image. Both of these factors could reduce the quality of the image and interfere with diagnosis.

Therefore, use of a thyroid shield during mammography is not recommended. Patients are urged not to put off or forego necessary breast imaging care.

Nurses Honored with DAISY Award


Nurses at Bradley County Medical Center were honored with The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses ®. This award is part of the DAISY Foundation's mission to recognize the extraordinary, compassionate nursing care they provide patients and families every day. The Award at Bradley County Medical Center is co-sponsored by generous donations. Initial funding was provided by the facility. The program is maintained through generous support from donors, to include a large donation from an anonymous donor, from committee members, from the Employee Council, and from Yankee Candle Sales.

All individuals, who had received nominations for The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses ® since its inception here at Bradley County Medical Center, were honored at this ceremony. BCMC began taking nominations in the Fall of 2017. The following individuals received nominations: Jean Rhodes, Laci Dalton, Dana Sawyer, Devin Hargrave, Kim Langford, Summer O'Conner, and Laci Dalton.

Four nurses were chosen to receive The DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses ®. Awards were given for the fourth quarter 2017, the first, second, and third quarters of 2018 with the honorees being Dana Sawyer, Summer O'Conner, Jean Rhodes, and Laci Dalton. Each honoree received a certificate commending her for being an "Extraordinary Nurse." The certificate reads: "In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people." The Honoree will also be given a beautiful and meaningful sculpture called A Healer's Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Africa.

The DAISY Foundation is a not-for-profit organization, established in memory of J. Patrick Barnes, by members of his family. Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. (DAISY is an acronym for Diseases Attacking the Immune System.) The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

Nurses were nominated by patients, families, and colleagues. The nominations were blinded and voted on by the DAISY Committee. Committee members include: Katrina Hammock, Ruthie Griffin, Joyce Lephiew, Tammy Deal, Stephanie Slaughter, and Laci Dalton. Cheryl Wells, serves as DAISY coordinator. The nominations were graded based on set criteria, a numeric value was assigned based on this criteria, and awards were determined based on score. The committee members voted. The process was overseen by the DAISY coordinator.

This is one initiative of The DAISY Foundation to express gratitude to the nursing profession. Additionally, DAISY offers J. Patrick Barnes Grants for Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Projects, The DAISY Faculty Award to honor inspiring faculty members in schools and colleges of nursing, and The DAISY in Training Award for nursing students. More information is available at http://DAISYfoundation.org.

BCMC Welcomes New Chief Nursing Officer


Sarah Tucker was named as the Chief Nursing Officer for Bradley County Medical Center in May 2017. As CNO she is responsible for clinical oversight for nursing practice throughout the medical center and for business and administrative functions related to the nursing departments.

Ms. Tucker began her career in healthcare in 1991 in a rural hospital as a unit coordinator. She earned a degree in nursing from the University of Arkansas at Monticello in 1992. Upon graduating, she moved to a staff nurse role on a medical surgical unit. She has subsequently served in the role of charge nurse, house supervisor, case manager, Director of Nursing and Chief Clinical Officer in a Critical Access Hospital. She has extensive experience in all clinical settings within rural hospitals, as well as physicians' clinics and home health. In addition, she has worked in both hospice and long term care.

Sarah is a lifelong resident of Drew County. She enjoys reading, working in her yard and is an avid college football fan. Her passions in life are nursing and family. She and her husband are proud parents of 7 children and 8 wonderful grandchildren. She can be reached at stucker@bcmed.org.


Certified Nurse Manager and Leader


October 5, 2016 - BCMC along with The America Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) and the American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) is proud to announce that Tiffany L. Holland has earned the designation of Certified Nurse Manager and Leader (CNML). The CNML is a national credential that distinguishes an individual as being among the elite in a critical role of nurse manager.

To earn the CNML, an individual must satisfy eligibility requirements that incorporate a blend of work experience and education, agree to adhere to Professional Standards of Conduct, and pass the CNML examination. The CNML examination tests knowledge required of a competent nurse manager professional in the areas of financial management, human resource management, performance improvement, and strategic management and technology. The CNML Program supports the community of nurse manager professionals and is designed to provide an objective and rigorous assessment of professional knowledge and competence.

Tiffany has been employed at BCMC since 2006. She worked as a staff nurse in the Emergency Department and then the Point of Care Contact prior to accepting the position of Chief Nursing Officer in 2013.


American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography®


September 23, 2016 - Leanna Williams, BSDMS RT(R), RVT, RDMS(AB)(OB)(BR) has been an employee of BCMC for over 11 years and has recently met the rigorous qualifications for breast ultrasound certification by the premier credentialing organization for sonography professions, the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography® (ARDMS).

Achievement of this certification acknowledges Williams's personal achievement of a highly recognized professional standard of excellence along with communicating her commitment to patient care and safety. ARDMS certifications represent the highest level of proficiency in the medical imaging modality of sonography (ultrasound) testing. She is also registered in abdominal, obstetrical & gynecology, and vascular ultrasound as well as radiologic technology (x-ray).


Greater Delta Alliance for Health - Stroke Education and Prevention


The Greater Delta Alliance for Health, a non-profit organization, is comprised of ten South Arkansas Delta hospitals, with Bradley County Medical Center being on of them. All ten hospitals participate in the AR SAVES stroke program. This valuable association reflects the GDAH's belief that by empowering local health care providers through education and resources, patients will get the proper help they need - when they need it the most.

Would you know what to do if you or a loved one were to have a stroke? Click Here to learn the risk factors and warning signs of a stroke and to also watch a short video on the subject.


Hospital Compare Data


Bradley County Medical Center ranks 4 out of 5 stars according to the National Hospital Compare Data which was recently updated on July 27, 2016. Follow the link below to view the full report for Bradley County Medical Center:
BCMC 2016 Hospital Compare Report


2016 Newborn Screening Conference


The PKU newborn screening is required by federal law. It is a blood specimen collected when the baby is 24 hours old. Our goal is to submit all PKU's to Arkansas Department of Health in Little Rock such that testing can begin within 48 hours of collection. The goal of the total turnaround time of test completion is 10 days. The PKU test detects various congenital metabolic disorders which are extremely serious if left undetected and therefore untreated.

"In 2013, nationwide data targeted the need for scrutiny of this process. At that time, we established a log book tracking each specimen. We monitor when the specimen is collected, when it is taken to our local Health Unit for delivery to Little Rock by courier, when it is received at ADH in Little Rock, and when the report is received from Little Rock. We monitor our performance and Arkansas Department of Health monitors our performance as well." - Patti Kremers, MT (ASCP) SC, Laboratory Director

Both the Labor & Delivery/Nursery and Laboratory departments received a Certificate of Achievement for "reaching 100% Newborn Screening Specimens submission rate 2 out of 5 months between January 2016-May 2016" as well as "significant improvement of Newborn Screening Specimens submission rate between January 2016-May 2016" at the 2016 Screening Conference that was held in Little Rock, Arkansas on June 9, 2016.

The Labor & Delivery/Nursery department also received a Certificate of Excellence in "Infant Hearing Program Quality Improvement".


BCMC Home Health Agency Receives Patient Satisfaction Award of Distinction


The Patient Satisfaction Award of Distinction is presented annually to home health organizations subscribed to Fazzi's Patient Satisfaction Service that have demonstrated superior performance in overall patient satisfaction results. These national best practice agencies are proven leaders and have placed in the top 25% of Fazzi's patient satisfaction national database based on a comparative analysis of overall satisfaction. Congratulations to BCMC HHA for receiving this distinguised award!


BCMC Chief Executive Officer Named Greater Delta Alliance for Health's Chairman


The Greater Delta Alliance for Health, Inc. (GDAH) is a non-profit, horizontal hospital network governed by the Chief Executive Officers of the following hospitals in the southeast quadrant of the State of Arkansas: Ashley County Medical Center, Baptist Health-Stuttgart, Bradley County Medical Center, Chicot Memerial Medical Center, Dallas County Medical Center, Delta Memorial Hospital, DeWitt Hospital & Nursing Home, Drew Memorial Hospital, Jefferson Regional Medical Center, and McGehee Hospital. This unique network is the largest healthcare service provider in the area with participating sites and rural residents located in Arkansas, Ashley, Bradley, Chicot, Dallas, Desha, Drew and Jefferson Counties. Together, the GDAH will continue to expand, nurture and resource programs throughout the Alliance Service Area.

Rex Jones, CEO of Bradley County Medical Center, was recently named GDAH Chairman. Jones began his career in executive leadership positions in both For-Profit and Not-ForProfit hospitals in Kansas and Oklahoma, earning his MBA from the University of Phoenix along the way. Jones was elected NE Region Chair for the Oklahoma Hospital Association, was appointed to positions on the Councils of Rural Health and Education and elected Charter President of the Okmulgee County Wellness Coalition, a successful community health alliance. "I have always been committed to community health and wellness," he said. Jones has been successful in assisting hospitals return to financial viability and as CEO of Okmulgee Memorial Hospital in Oklahoma he recorded four straight years of profit after fifteen years of negative margins. Since stepping in as CEO of BCMC in September 2013, he has reduced the loss in operations from $2.3 million to $900,000 and is working diligently to cut that figure even more. But Jones said it's equally important to "never lose focus on the mission of providing care to all members of the community." That compassionate attitude extends to staff members, one of whom said, "He is always there to listen with genuine concern and offers great advice when needed. He is involved with the employees, has made great changes for BCMC and is a big supporter of our community projects."

Jones' support for the community and its healthcare will continue in his role as Chairman of the GDAH, who have stated that the organization is privileged and honored to have him leading the way as they continue their work to provide a better healthcare system in the Arkansas Delta.

To see what else is going on in the GDAH, CLICK HERE


Two Nurses Receive Recognition As Certified Lactation Counselors



Kristina Morrison, RN, L&D/Nursery Manager and Elizabeth Lawson, LPN have received recognition as Certified Lactation Counselors. This CLC credential signifies that the holder has demonstrated the necessary skills, knowledge, and attitudes to provide breastfeeding counseling and management support to families who are thinking about breastfeeding or who have questions or problems during the course of breastfeeding/lactation. CLCs are dedicated to the promotion, protection, and support of breastfeeding and human lactation in their work to prevent and solve breastfeeding problems. They understand that breastfeeding works best when it is the cultural norm and when the provider of lactation support and services is culturally competent. Obtaining the CLC credential is a way of demonstrating knowledge and skills in lactation management.

Bradley County Medical Center offers breastfeeding classes and support. Contact Krissy at (870) 226-4328 for more information and available classes.


January 2016 - American Hospital Association Highlights Bradley County Medical Center in "Ideas & Innovations" Publication


The American Hospital Association has chosen Bradley County Medical Center for inclusion in its 2016 edition of "Community Connections: Ideas & Innovations for Hospital Leaders." The annual publication features case examples from across the country on how hospitals and health systems are improving community health. It is distributed nationwide to hospital CEOs as a way to inspire initiatives and spark dialogue. Only two programs from each state and Washington, D.C., are selected every year, qualifying for one of four categories: Access and Quality, Health Behaviors, Socioeconomic Factors, or Physical Environment. Bradley County Medical Center was included in the Socioeconomic Factors section. To view the 2016 case example booklet and read the Bradley County Medical Center case study, CLICK HERE (we're featured on page 26).


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Angel One Transport Recognizes BCMC's Lephiew, Staff




Angel One Transport of Arkansas Children's Hospital recently recognized the outstanding assistance of Bradley County Medical Center's Roy Lephiew along with the entire maintenance crew and nursing staff.